Home improvement scammers take money for no work

Adelicia Caree

Better Business Bureau serving Canton Region and Greater West Virginia offers tips and advice for consumers to avoid fraudulent practices. Use caution when hiring a home improvement contractor. Scams abound, especially following a major storm, flood, or other weather event when many homeowners are trying to repair their houses. But […]

Better Business Bureau serving Canton Region and Greater West Virginia offers tips and advice for consumers to avoid fraudulent practices.

Use caution when hiring a home improvement contractor. Scams abound, especially following a major storm, flood, or other weather event when many homeowners are trying to repair their houses. But contractor scams can happen any time, so be wary of high-pressure sales tactics, up front fees, and fly-by-night businesses. Con artists will take homeowners’ money and deliver slipshod work … or no work at all.

HOW THE SCAM WORKS

Home improvement scams can start with a knock on the door, a flyer, or an ad. The contractor may offer a low price or a short timeframe. One common hook is when the scammer claims to be working in your neighborhood on another project and has leftover supplies.

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